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I finished reading Truly Madly Guilty by Liane Moriarty a few days ago and absolutely loved it. If you perused Goodread’s Best Books of 2016 list, you’ll see that Truly Madly Guilty made #1 in the fiction category. Moriarty is also the author of Big Little Lies, which was one of my favorite reads of the year. Truly Madly Guilty has also made my list of top favorites, as well. Have any of you read this book? If you’ve read Big Little Lies or Cynthia D’Aprix Sweeney’s The Nest, I can bet that you will enjoy this novel, as well. You can purchase Liane Moriarty’s Truly Madly Guilty here. I look forward to reading more of her books.

Summary: “Six responsible adults. Three cute kids. One small dog. It’s just a normal weekend. What could possibly go wrong?

Sam and Clementine have a wonderful, albeit, busy life: they have two little girls, Sam has just started a new dream job, and Clementine, a cellist, is busy preparing for the audition of a lifetime. If there’s anything they can count on, it’s each other.

Clementine and Erika are each other’s oldest friends. A single look between them can convey an entire conversation. But theirs is a complicated relationship, so when Erika mentions a last minute invitation to a barbecue with her neighbors, Tiffany and Vid, Clementine and Sam don’t hesitate. Having Tiffany and Vid’s larger than life personalities there will be a welcome respite.

Two months later, it won’t stop raining, and Clementine and Sam can’t stop asking themselves the question: What if we hadn’t gone?

In Truly Madly Guilty, Liane Moriarty takes on the foundations of our lives: marriage, sex, parenthood, and friendship. She shows how guilt can expose the fault lines in the most seemingly strong relationships, how what we don’t say can be more powerful than what we do, and how sometimes it is the most innocent of moments that can do the greatest harm.”

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It’s safe to say that I have a bit of a bookmark obsession. You can purchase this one here.

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Who else loves the Outlander series? I’m on the fourth book, Drums of Autumn, right now.

You can purchase this bookmark here.

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A few days ago, I finished reading my first book by Kurt Vonnegut. Slaughterhouse-Five is one of those classic books that I’ve been meaning to read for quite some time but never got around to until now. A few months ago, I started reading it and was immediately thrown off and annoyed by the heavy use of “so it goes”. When I came back to it, with the intention of looking beyond that repetitive phrase, I found myself thoroughly enjoying the content and unable to put it down. Time travel, World War II, aliens, family, relationships, different dimensions, and the meaning and meaninglessness of life, death, and everything in between are all elements and ideas that will stick with me, after having finished this book. One of my favorite quotations from Slaughterhouse-Five was, “Everything is nothing, with a twist.” This excerpt sums up my takeaways from this book. I definitely plan to read more of Vonnegut’s work in the near future. What were all of your thoughts on Slaughterhouse-Five?

You can purchase Slaughterhouse-Five here.

Contributor Book Review of ‘Me Before You

Me Before You by Jojo Moyes
Review by: Noelle Simonson

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Warning: This review contains spoilers. Read at your own risk.

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While I have read quite a few of Lorrie Moore’s short stories, this was my first time to read an entire collection of her work. Self-Help, confronts the ugliness of the human experience. Through her use of recurring themes, defense mechanism rooted uses of humor, and an experimental use of syntax, Moore crafted an effective thematic conversation. The stories within Self-Help speak to one another through the repetition of circumstances, dialogue, tone, and point of view. My own relationship with writing has evolved since reading Moore’s book.

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Jac Jemc’s My Only Wife was one of my favorite reads so far this year, without a doubt. Through offering readers immaculate characterization, repetition, and insight into relationships, Jemc showcases the obscure fundamentals of human behavior. Interspersed between the hauntingly brilliant, poetic language and character rich narrative are non-linear glimpses into the past relationship still existing in the narrator’s present. Jemc’s characters are complicated and unappealing. Their quirks and flaws make them seem more human than we usually get to know in fiction and in real life, unless we are at an intimate level with a person, like the husband in this novel is speaking from.
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